Saturday, June 24, 2017

How to Squeeze Electricity out of Crystals - Ashwini Bharathula


It might sound like science fiction, but if you press on a crystal of sugar, it will actually generate its own electricity. This simple crystal can act like a tiny power source because sugar happens to be piezoelectric. Ashwini Bharathula explains how piezoelectric materials turn mechanical stress, like pressure, sound waves and other vibrations into electricity, and vice versa.

Lesson by Ashwini Bharathula, animation by Karrot Animation.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

The Physics of Playing Guitar - Oscar Fernando Perez



Guitar masters like Jimi Hendrix are capable of bending the physics of waves to their wills, plucking melody from inspiration and vibration. But how do wood, metal, and plastic translate into rhythm, melody, and music? Oscar Fernando Perez details the physics of playing the guitar, from first pluck to that final shredding chord.

Lesson by Oscar Fernando Perez , animation by Chris Boyle.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Where Did Music Come From?



We've long believed that music as we know it is unique to our species. But as Anthony shows us, not only is this untrue, but in fact, human music may have been started by a little bird deep in the Amazon jungle.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Why Don't Perpetual Motion Machines Ever Work? - Netta Schramm


Perpetual motion machines — devices that can do work indefinitely without any external energy source — have captured many inventors’ imaginations because they could totally transform our relationship with energy. There’s just one problem: they don’t work. Why not? Netta Schramm describes the pitfalls of perpetual motion machines.

Lesson by Netta Schramm, animation by TED-Ed.

Friday, June 9, 2017

The Scientific Benefits of Music


Did you know that listening to music is good for you? This is our science fact of the day and it is all about listening to your favorite tunes!

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

The Chukar Cherries Video


An exploration of Chukar Cherries' roots in Washington's cherry region. Chukar has been transforming the fruits of the Northwest into chocolates, sauces, and wholesome snacks for over 25 years.

Chukar Cherries are Available at Mozart, Einstein & Me!

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The World’s Most Mysterious Book - Stephen Bax


Deep inside Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library lies a 240 page tome. Recently carbon dated to around 1420, its pages feature looping handwriting and hand drawn images seemingly stolen from a dream. It is called the Voynich manuscript, and it’s one of history’s biggest unsolved mysteries. The reason why? No one can figure out what it says. Stephen Bax investigates this cryptic work. 

Lesson by Stephen Bax, animation by TED-Ed.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Summer Rhythm & African Percussion Classes - Starts Tomorrow!


Rhythm & African Percussion Classes

KIDS: Thursdays: June 1-22 & June 29-July 27
(skip July 6th)

Ages 6-8: 3:00-4:00pm
Ages 9-13: 4:00-5:00pm

ADULTS: Thursdays: June 1-29 & July 13-August 17
(skip August 3rd)

Beginners: 7:00-8:00pm
Intermediate: 8:15-9:15pm

These classes are a fun and easy way to improve one’s rhythmic skills, while fostering a musical ground-work to last a lifetime and build community at the same time. Drums provided!

Classes are held at Mozart, Einstein & Me
620 First Street, Benicia, CA

Call 707-746-7565 for info and to register, or visit www.holisticdrum.com

Sunday, May 28, 2017

2017 Summer Violin Workshop for Kids - Last Day to Sign-Up is Tuesday!


An introductory class for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music.

Ages: 7-12

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. Please sign-up by contacting the number/email below. Deadline is on May 30th, 2017.

Class size: 6-8 students

Time: Every Tuesdays from 6:45pm to 8:00pm (June 13th - July 25th; no class on July 4th)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $165.00

For more information, please contact Melissa at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Thursday, May 25, 2017

How Does Your Body Process Medicine? - Céline Valéry


Have you ever wondered what happens to a painkiller, like ibuprofen, after you swallow it? Medicine that slides down your throat can help treat a headache, a sore back, or a throbbing sprained ankle. But how does it get where it needs to go in the first place? Céline Valéry explains how your body processes medicine.

Lesson by Céline Valéry, animation by Daniel Gray.

Monday, May 22, 2017

Summer Rhythm & African Percussion Classes


Rhythm & African Percussion Classes

KIDS: Thursdays: June 1-22 & June 29-July 27
(skip July 6th)

Ages 6-8: 3:00-4:00pm
Ages 9-13: 4:00-5:00pm

ADULTS: Thursdays: June 1-29 & July 13-August 17
(skip August 3rd)

Beginners: 7:00-8:00pm
Intermediate: 8:15-9:15pm

These classes are a fun and easy way to improve one’s rhythmic skills, while fostering a musical ground-work to last a lifetime and build community at the same time. Drums provided!

Classes are held at Mozart, Einstein & Me
620 First Street, Benicia, CA

Call 707-746-7565 for info and to register, or visit www.holisticdrum.com

Friday, May 19, 2017

2017 Summer Violin Workshop for Kids!


An introductory class for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music.

Ages: 7-12

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. Please sign-up by contacting the number/email below. Deadline is on May 30th, 2017.

Class size: 6-8 students

Time: Every Tuesdays from 6:45pm to 8:00pm (June 13th - July 25th; no class on July 4th)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $165.00

For more information, please contact Melissa at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

How the Popsicle Was Invented | Moments of Vision 11 - Jessica Oreck


Each year, approximately 2 billion popsicles are sold worldwide. But where did the idea for this tasty treat come from? In the eleventh installment of our ‘Moments of Vision’ series, Jessica Oreck shares the distracted origins of the popsicle.

Lesson and animation by Jessica Oreck.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Jazz Guitarist Stanley Jordan on Music Therapy Benefits


Jazz guitarist Stanley Jordan tells WSJ's Lee Hawkins about his study of music therapy and how it's used to help people overcome illnesses and chronic conditions. Photo: Stanley Jordan

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

2017 Summer Violin Workshop for Kids!


An introductory class for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music.

Ages: 7-12

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. Please sign-up by contacting the number/email below. Deadline is on May 30th, 2017.

Class size: 6-8 students

Time: Every Tuesdays from 6:45pm to 8:00pm (June 13th - July 25th; no class on July 4th)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $165.00

For more information, please contact Melissa at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Check Your intuition: The Birthday Problem - David Knuffke


Imagine a group of people. How big do you think the group would have to be before there’s more than a 50% chance that two people in the group have the same birthday? The answer is … probably lower than you think. David Knuffke explains how the birthday problem exposes our often-poor intuition when it comes to probability.

Lesson by David Knuffke, animation by TED-Ed.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

The Positive Psychological Effects of Music - Benefits of Making and Listening to Music


Learn about the positive benefits of listening to music and the creative psychological effects of creating music in this educational animation. Tons of people listen to hundreds of songs a day for lots of reasons, but this video will break down why we do, and reasons we should keep listening to music. Music has tons of effects on the brain, and a book title “Music and the Mind” is a great resource for more information.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Can You Solve the Pirate Riddle? - Alex Gendler


It’s a good day to be a pirate. Amaro and his four mateys – Bart, Charlotte, Daniel, and Eliza have struck gold – a chest with 100 coins. But now, they must divvy up the booty according to the pirate code — and pirate code is notoriously complicated. Can you help come up with the distribution that Amaro should propose to make sure he lives to tell the tale? Alex Gendler shows how.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

Friday, April 28, 2017

Why Do Songs Get Stuck In Your Head?


So, you can't get that song out of your head? You probably have an earworm. Why is this happening? Well, science isn't very clear on this yet. Laci sits down and to discuss what we do know about earworms, and offers some advice on how to get rid of them.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Why Do We Itch? - Emma Bryce


The average person experiences dozens of individual itches each day. We’ve all experienced the annoyance of an inconvenient itch — but have you ever pondered why we itch in the first place? Is there actually an evolutionary purpose to the itch, or is it simply there to annoy us? Emma Bryce digs deep into the skin to find out.

Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Sashko Danylenko.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Earth Day Event TODAY at Mozart, Einstein & Me!


2017 Earth Day Event at Mozart, Einstein and Me 
in Benicia and Livermore
April 22, 2017 3 - 6pm while supplies last

Fore more information call: (707) 746-7565

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

2017 Earth Day Event at Mozart, Einstein and Me


2017 Earth Day Event at Mozart, Einstein and Me 
in Benicia and Livermore
April 22, 2017 3 - 6pm while supplies last

Fore more information call: (707) 746-7565

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Why Do Animals Have Such Different Lifespans? - Joao Pedro de Magalhaes


For the microscopic lab worm C. elegans, life equates to just a few short weeks on Earth. The bowhead whale, on the other hand, can live over two hundred years. Why are these lifespans so different? And what does it really mean to ‘age' anyway? Joao Pedro de Magalhaes explains why the pace of aging varies greatly across animals.

Lesson by Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, animation by Sharon Colman.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Monday, April 10, 2017

How Does Music Affect the Brain: 16 Great Benefits


If you’re wondering how does music affect the brain then you must know that there are many ways in which music affects the brain. It can bring back memories, it improves focus, it improves our creativity, music increases our verbal IQ levels, music can alter our state of consciousness, it eases pain, musical choices can affect our personalities, music can improve productivity, it improves visual attention, it influences hormone secretion, it eliminates anxiety, it improves our reasoning and motor skills, music can help bring people together, music can help treat heart disease, music can help us to read other people, music can increase your immune system and more.

Playing music helps your brain relax. If you’re tired play your favorite music and you should immediately feel better. I heard once from a scientist that each of us should listen to our favorite music at least for 20 minutes a day.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Can You Solve the Virus Riddle? - Lisa Winer


Your research team has found a prehistoric virus preserved in the permafrost and isolated it for study. After a late night working, you’re just closing up the lab when a sudden earthquake hits and breaks all the sample vials. Will you be able to destroy the virus before the vents open and unleash a deadly airborne plague? Lisa Winer shows how.

Lesson by Lisa Winer, animation by Artrake Studio.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

4 Powerful Benefits Of Learning a Musical Instrument After 50


When you think of a “typical” music student, you might picture a 7-year-old girl, sitting nervously in front of a piano, her tiny fingers resting lightly on the keys. Several decades ago, you may have even been that little girl. Well, if you think that musical instruments are just for kids, it’s probably time to update your soundtrack. There are plenty of reasons people over 50 should consider adding a little music to their lives.

Music is for Your Brain what Circuit Training is for Your Body

As the fitter baby boomers among us know, circuit training involves moving from one exercise machine to another, while giving ourselves a total body workout. There are very few activities that can do the same for your brain – and music is one of them.

According to researchers, most activities use only a few areas of the brain at a time. Playing a musical instrument, on the other hand, sets of a symphony of activity all over your brain.

So, if you are interested in keeping your mind sharp in the decades ahead, you may want to put down the TV remote and pick up a set of drumsticks or a violin bow.

Watch this short TEDvideo for an explanation of exactly how playing a musical instrument affects your brain.


Your Choice of Instrument is a Reflection of Your Personality

Were you forced to play a musical instrument as a child? Many of us are first introduced to playing music when we pick up our first recorder in elementary school. Others are required by, occasionally over-optimistic, parents to learn the piano or violin.

There’s nothing wrong with introducing kids to music. In fact, this is a great idea. At the same time, many of us leave childhood with apathy, if not outright distaste, for playing music. There is something about being forced to do something that steals all of the fun from the activity.

Now that you are in your 50s or 60s, you get to call the shots. Is there an instrument that you have always been fascinated with? Have you, perhaps, always wanted to play the drums? Or, did you idolize guitar players in your youth? Do you have a secret desire to be a DJ? Now is the time to turn your musical dreams into reality.

Learning an Instrument is a Great Way to Make Friends

Life after 50 can be a challenging time from a social perspective. With their kids out of the house, many baby boomers find themselves lacking the social ties that they had in other stages of their lives. In addition, many of us have gone through a divorce or lost a partner.

Learning an instrument can be a fantastic way to get out into the world and meet new people on your own terms. In the beginning, your main interaction may be with your teacher. But, after a while, you will start to meet other musicians who share a passion for your instrument or style of music.

Who knows, after several years, you may even decide to join a band or start one of your own.

Music Can Build Your Self-Esteem

Learning an instrument is one of the best ways to build your confidence. For starters, it is something that you can do from the comfort of your home, at least in the beginning. There are tons of online courses that can teach you anything from guitar to electronic music production. Every note you play will ring out as proof that you can do anything that you set your mind to.

One of the biggest myths about aging is that the older we get the less able we are to learn new things. What nonsense! This isn’t true at 70 and it certainly isn’t true at 50. So, why not add a little music to your life? Your body, brain and social life will thank you!

Article Source: http://sixtyandme.com/benefits-of-learning-a-musical-instrument-after-50/

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Jellyfish Predate Dinosaurs. How Have They Survived So Long? - David Gruber


Some are longer than a blue whale. Others are barely larger than a grain of sand. One species unleashes one of the most deadly venoms on earth; another holds a secret that’s behind some of the greatest breakthroughs in biology. They’ve inhabited the ocean for at least half a billion years, and they’re still flourishing. David Gruber investigates the secret powers of jellyfish.

Lesson by David Gruber, animation by Silvia Prietov.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Why New Music Feels Amazing


Ever heard a song for the first time and fallen in love? As Trace tells us, there's a biological reason for why new music feels so good.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

What Makes a Poem … a Poem? - Melissa Kovacs


What exactly makes a poem … a poem? Poets themselves have struggled with this question, often using metaphors to approximate a definition. Is a poem a little machine? A firework? An echo? A dream? Melissa Kovacs shares three recognizable characteristics of most poetry.

Lesson by Melissa Kovacs, animation by Ace & Son Moving Picture Co., LLC.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Music Prodigy, 11, Readies for First Opera's Debut


Music prodigy Alma Deutscher is not only talented on the violin and piano. The 11-year-old has also composed her first opera, a modern take on "Cinderella," that will play in Vienna this month. Seth Doane reports.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Symphony of Science - Music Therapy in Health Care: Carly Flaagan at TEDxGrandForks


After witnessing firsthand how beneficial a music therapy and speech language pathology collaboration could be for the shared client, music therapy student Carly Flaagan realized, like many others before her, interprofessional health care with the inclusion of music therapy was something to explore. Now as there is a push towards healthcare becoming interdisciplinary, the health care system benefits most from taking a holistic approach. Because music is a part of everyone, a holistic approach that addresses, the "whole" person, should include music. Flaagan explains how music therapy is an integral part of tomorrow's interprofessional health care.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

How Braille Was Invented | Moments of Vision 9 - Jessica Oreck


Today, Braille is the universally accepted system of writing for the blind, translated into almost every language in almost every country across the globe. But it didn’t actually start out as a tool for the blind. Jessica Oreck details the surprising wartime origins of Braille.

Lesson and animation by Jessica Oreck.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

6 Benefits Of Music - How Music Can Help


Everywhere you look, (or I guess listen), music is all around us. It's on the television we watch, the commercials trying to sell us something and in all forms of entertainment you can think of. The use of music to infuse a particular feeling or emotion is abundant and effective everywhere.

Music as a sales tool is well known and powerful, but what about using music as a form of therapy? If commercials and television can project a certain feeling with it, then why can't we use it to invoke the same response for ourselves in a positive manner?

When going through a divorce, music played a large role in helping me feel better. At the time, it didn't matter how, but playing music made me feel better, so that's what I did. I listened to it, which encouraged me to learn it. The more I practiced, the more it helped me feel better.

There are many different ways in which music can assist in getting through difficult times. And many of those qualities can help anyone struggling with change.

Reduces Stress: Some music when listened to can help reduce stress and anxiety. Listening to soft, soothing music is often used in the practice of meditation to help calm the mind.

Helps With Depression: Depression can be a very debilitating stage we go through when recovering from some loss. Listening to music can release endorphins, making us feel better, even if it's just a little, it can help bring you up.

Builds Confidence: When taking music to the next level, like learning how to play the guitar, the benefits of music become more intense. Learning something new can do great things for your confidence, very useful when times are tough.

Teaches Discipline: Once again, when taking on an activity like learning the guitar, discipline is needed in order to advance with it. In order to get better at playing an instrument, you need to practice and discipline assists in keeping you motivated to practice.

Promotes Teamwork: If you enjoy playing and become confident with it, you may start looking at joining a band. When joining to play with others, teamwork is essential in having a successful partnership.

Social Outlet: Music has always been the center of social gatherings. It's an opportunity for people to have something to discuss and share experiences with. From the big arena to the small venue down the street, music brings people together socially.

Music plays a critical role in our lives, from how we feel about ourselves to being around others with the same interest. When looking for something to help bring some interest back into your life, music can be an excellent opportunity to learn and discover more about yourself.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Scott_Dziadul

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7379563

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Does Playing Classical Music Make Your Baby Smarter?



Some people say playing classical music, even before a baby is born, will make them smarter, but is this actually true?

Sunday, March 5, 2017

How to Practice Effectively...for Just About Anything - Annie Bosler and Don Greene


Mastering any physical skill takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. But what does practice actually do to make us better at things? Annie Bosler and Don Greene explain how practice affects the inner workings of our brains.

Lesson by Annie Bosler and Don Greene, animation by Martina Meštrović.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Why Does Music Make Us Cry?


Join Jason Silva as he freestyles complex systems of society, technology and human existence and discusses the truth and beauty of science in a form of existential jazz.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Amazing Health Benefits of Music


There is no single definition that will encompass all the facets of music. As observed, music is not exclusive to human beings – animals make music too! One of the most famous lines about music is that it is a universal language. For some reason, music affects people in ways that are utterly inexplicable. To some, communication through music goes deeper than words and letters can penetrate. There are some parts of our emotions and beings that are affected by music in the most peculiar ways. Over the years, in fact, scientists have been correlating music and health.

Here are some of the effects of music to human health – physically and mentally.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Can You Solve the Three Gods Riddle? - Alex Gendler


You and your team have crash-landed on an ancient planet. Can you appease the three alien overlords who rule it and get your team safely home? Created by logician Raymond Smullyan, and popularized by his colleague George Boolos, this riddle has been called the hardest logic puzzle ever. Alex Gendler shows how to solve it.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

How Small Are We in the Scale of the Universe? - Alex Hofeldt


In 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky – what, if anything, was going to show up? But what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 galaxies glimmering in a tiny sliver of the universe. Alex Hofeldt helps us understand the scale of this image.

Lesson by Alex Hofeldt, animation by Bliink.

Hubble Deep Field Image Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field Team, and NASA.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Why Music Makes the World Go Round


Music is an expression of human experience and therefore, everyone has a love for a particular kind of music. Music is found in many areas of our life including presidential inaugurations, graduation ceremonies, weddings and funerals. The ambiance in a room can be changed by adding some music - some upbeat sounds in church or soft music at the dentist office can transform the environment. There are different genres or styles including classical, jazz, hip hop, rap, rhythm and blues, rock & roll, country, folk, bluegrass, metal, world new age etc. The reasons why it makes the world to go round include:

· Music guides the emotions

Whether we know it or not, it plays an important role in our lives. It easily affects our emotions whether we are aware or not. An individual only needs to think about the music heard on a particular movie soundtrack. Although a person may be aware of the dialogue, the costumes, the scenery, the action and special effect, it supports all and guides the emotional context. When you consider some of the best movie, music plays an active role. Even in bad films, music holds the story together. It is so important to movies that the studio executives often scrutinize it to determine the effects generated by a particular scene.

· Music is important in advertising

TV programs have musical underscores. Furthermore, many of the commercials use it to sell their products - the commercial feature tunes that remain engrained in our memories. This makes it possible to remember a product resulting in making a purchase.

· Music is business of many organizations

Radio in particular remains relevant as a result of providing music most of the times, seven days a week. Different radio stations offer the tones in different styles imaginable to appeal to the listeners. Record stores too are in the business of selling music. Therefore, they remain relevant as long as they offer music that is appealing to their niche market. Giant arenas or large concerts remain relevant to the thousands who gather by making it possible to share the experience with the audience. If you are to generate a high return on investment it is important to know exactly what to present.

· Music develops the brain

Singing and making melodies plays an important role in developing the brain fully and extensively. This is particularly the case in the early years. Music helps to make an individual brighter, more logical, more intelligent, more capable and more rational. According to further research music improves the study habits as well as test scores.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sila_Rodney

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7887592

Sunday, February 12, 2017

A Brief History of Numerical Systems - Alessandra King


1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.

Lesson by Alessandra King, animation by Zedem Media.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

There Are Many Benefits to Learning an Instrument


There are so many advantages to learning to play an instrument. The benefits are many, and can carry many years into your life. Whether young or old, it is a worthwhile investment of our time to undertake the fun task of learning to play.

First of all, the research shows that exposing children to music, and music training, can improve a childs' reading age, their IQ, and it affects the development of certain areas of the brain. Adults who learn and practice an instrument, are helping their minds to stay alert and focused. And there is evidence that it helps the memory.

Those who practice an instrument are teaching themselves to be disciplined as well. For you must set aside time to work on your new skills, which can be rewarding and fun in itself. And self-discipline is an area every person can use improvement in. And carries into every other area of our lives. Music can be a great way to relieve stress. We have all had those days that our stress level is elevated, and the right song can soothe us, and help to relieve some stress. And there is something even better about hearing that music come from an instrument that you are playing.

There is a great sense of achievement in playing tunes on your own instrument. It may not happen overnight, but the dedication and work involved adds to the great feeling you get when that music comes to life by your own hands. Yes, it is hard work, but it is also a lot of fun. And it is very rewarding as well.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Waters

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3841745

Friday, February 3, 2017

Everything You Need to Know to Read Homer's "Odyssey" - Jill Dash


An encounter with a man-eating giant. A sorceress who turns men into pigs. A long-lost king taking back his throne. On their own, any of these make great stories. But each is just one episode in the "Odyssey," a 12,000-line poem spanning years of ancient Greek history and legend. So how do we make sense of this massive text? Jill Dash shares everything you need to know to read Homer's "Odyssey.”

Lesson by Jill Dash, animation by David Price.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Why You Shouldn’t Quit Your Music Lessons



Did you take music lessons as a kid? Here’s how the benefits could follow you for the rest of your life!

Saturday, January 28, 2017

TONIGHT Bob Belanski’s Specdrum Presents: Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band


Saturday Jan 28, 2017
Starts at 8pm doors open 7pm.

Bob Belanski’s Specdrum presents:

The 19 piece Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band
directed by
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet Virtuoso)
featuring
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet, Composer, Arranger)
Played/recorded with Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Henderson,
Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, McCoy Tyner, Horace
Silver and the Specdrum Big Band.

Featuring Special Guest Artist Steve Turre, Trombone and Sea Shells. Steve is a famous artist who recorded with Pharoah Sanders, Art Blakey, Roland Kirk, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Lewis/Thad Jones; he is a 24 time 1st place winner in Downbeat Magazine Reader and Critic Polls, trombonist for the NBC Saturday Night Live Orchestra, and much much more. Also featuring John Capobianco, trumpet, and Bob Belanski, drums and composer.

In 1966 Warren Gale Jr. met Joe Henderson in NY, played in his original band combos, giged until 1968. During this time he played with Roland Kirk, Steve Ellington on drums, Horace Silver on piano. Sat in with George Coleman. Played sessions at Slugg’s Saloon with Sunny Murray, Joe Henderson, Woody Shaw. Also sessions with Sam Rivers and Andrew Hill.

Joined Buddy Rich Band with Al Porcino on lead trumpet in 1968. Moved to L.A. and then Bay Area. Asked to join the Stan Kenton Big Band in 1971. Duke Ellington performed with us in 1970 at a new club. After playing “Take the A Train,” Mr. Ellington was heard on the Microphone saying: ” I always wanted to play with this band, but they won’t fire the piano player!” Stan laughed so hard he could barely count off the next tune.

Returned to Berkeley in Spring 1971.

Joe Henderson came to San Francisco in 1972-3. Warren played with Horace Silver in SF, 1975 at the Keystone Korner. Played gigs with Joe Henderson, in several venues and went to Seattle with Joe. By then people were lined up to hear him as he had won more than one Grammy award. Continued to play clubs, festivals, college concerts until 1988. Joe Henderson Big Band is re established in 1989 and played at Yoshi’s Kimballs, and college festivasl as well as the LA Playboy Jazz Festival in 1998. These gigs were all with Joe Henderson. Reformed the Joe Henderson Big Band in 2004 at Contra Costa College until 2008. Continued to play Yoshi’s in Oakland and San Francisco.

Start time is 8pm and Doors open at 7pm.

General Admission 
$25 in advance - $30 day of show

Reserve a front row table - table price $200


More Information HERE

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

The Mathematics of Sidewalk Illusions - Fumiko Futamura


Have you ever come across an oddly stretched image on the sidewalk, only to find that it looks remarkably realistic if you stand in exactly the right spot? These sidewalk illusions employ a technique called anamorphosis — a special case of perspective art where artists represent 3D views on 2D surfaces. So how is it done? Fumiko Futamura traces the history and mathematics of perspective.

Lesson by Fumiko Futamura, animation by TED-Ed.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Bob Belanski’s Specdrum Presents: Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band


Saturday Jan 28, 2017
Starts at 8pm doors open 7pm.

Bob Belanski’s Specdrum presents:

The 19 piece Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band
directed by
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet Virtuoso)
featuring
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet, Composer, Arranger)
Played/recorded with Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Henderson,
Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, McCoy Tyner, Horace
Silver and the Specdrum Big Band.

Featuring Special Guest Artist Steve Turre, Trombone and Sea Shells. Steve is a famous artist who recorded with Pharoah Sanders, Art Blakey, Roland Kirk, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Lewis/Thad Jones; he is a 24 time 1st place winner in Downbeat Magazine Reader and Critic Polls, trombonist for the NBC Saturday Night Live Orchestra, and much much more. Also featuring John Capobianco, trumpet, and Bob Belanski, drums and composer.

In 1966 Warren Gale Jr. met Joe Henderson in NY, played in his original band combos, giged until 1968. During this time he played with Roland Kirk, Steve Ellington on drums, Horace Silver on piano. Sat in with George Coleman. Played sessions at Slugg’s Saloon with Sunny Murray, Joe Henderson, Woody Shaw. Also sessions with Sam Rivers and Andrew Hill.

Joined Buddy Rich Band with Al Porcino on lead trumpet in 1968. Moved to L.A. and then Bay Area. Asked to join the Stan Kenton Big Band in 1971. Duke Ellington performed with us in 1970 at a new club. After playing “Take the A Train,” Mr. Ellington was heard on the Microphone saying: ” I always wanted to play with this band, but they won’t fire the piano player!” Stan laughed so hard he could barely count off the next tune.

Returned to Berkeley in Spring 1971.

Joe Henderson came to San Francisco in 1972-3. Warren played with Horace Silver in SF, 1975 at the Keystone Korner. Played gigs with Joe Henderson, in several venues and went to Seattle with Joe. By then people were lined up to hear him as he had won more than one Grammy award. Continued to play clubs, festivals, college concerts until 1988. Joe Henderson Big Band is re established in 1989 and played at Yoshi’s Kimballs, and college festivasl as well as the LA Playboy Jazz Festival in 1998. These gigs were all with Joe Henderson. Reformed the Joe Henderson Big Band in 2004 at Contra Costa College until 2008. Continued to play Yoshi’s in Oakland and San Francisco.

Start time is 8pm and Doors open at 7pm.

General Admission 
$25 in advance - $30 day of show

Reserve a front row table - table price $200


More Information HERE

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Rhythm & West African Percussion Classes Start Monday!


START: Mondays January 23rd - February 20th, 7pm-8pm

These classes are a fun and easy way to improve one’s rhythmic skills while fostering a musical groundwork to last a lifetime and build community at the same time. Drums provided!

Classes are held at Mozart, Einstein & Me: 2156 First Street, Livermore, CA.

Call 925-443-1244 for info and to register, or visit www.holisticdrum.com

Monday, January 16, 2017

Bob Belanski’s Specdrum Presents: Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band


Saturday Jan 28, 2017
Starts at 8pm doors open 7pm.

Bob Belanski’s Specdrum presents:

The 19 piece Joe Henderson Legacy Big Band
directed by
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet Virtuoso)
featuring
Warren Gale Jr.
(Trumpet, Composer, Arranger)
Played/recorded with Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Henderson,
Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, McCoy Tyner, Horace
Silver and the Specdrum Big Band.

Featuring Special Guest Artist Steve Turre, Trombone and Sea Shells. Steve is a famous artist who recorded with Pharoah Sanders, Art Blakey, Roland Kirk, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Lewis/Thad Jones; he is a 24 time 1st place winner in Downbeat Magazine Reader and Critic Polls, trombonist for the NBC Saturday Night Live Orchestra, and much much more. Also featuring John Capobianco, trumpet, and Bob Belanski, drums and composer.

In 1966 Warren Gale Jr. met Joe Henderson in NY, played in his original band combos, giged until 1968. During this time he played with Roland Kirk, Steve Ellington on drums, Horace Silver on piano. Sat in with George Coleman. Played sessions at Slugg’s Saloon with Sunny Murray, Joe Henderson, Woody Shaw. Also sessions with Sam Rivers and Andrew Hill.

Joined Buddy Rich Band with Al Porcino on lead trumpet in 1968. Moved to L.A. and then Bay Area. Asked to join the Stan Kenton Big Band in 1971. Duke Ellington performed with us in 1970 at a new club. After playing “Take the A Train,” Mr. Ellington was heard on the Microphone saying: ” I always wanted to play with this band, but they won’t fire the piano player!” Stan laughed so hard he could barely count off the next tune.

Returned to Berkeley in Spring 1971.

Joe Henderson came to San Francisco in 1972-3. Warren played with Horace Silver in SF, 1975 at the Keystone Korner. Played gigs with Joe Henderson, in several venues and went to Seattle with Joe. By then people were lined up to hear him as he had won more than one Grammy award. Continued to play clubs, festivals, college concerts until 1988. Joe Henderson Big Band is re established in 1989 and played at Yoshi’s Kimballs, and college festivasl as well as the LA Playboy Jazz Festival in 1998. These gigs were all with Joe Henderson. Reformed the Joe Henderson Big Band in 2004 at Contra Costa College until 2008. Continued to play Yoshi’s in Oakland and San Francisco.

Start time is 8pm and Doors open at 7pm.

General Admission 
$25 in advance - $30 day of show

Reserve a front row table - table price $200


More Information HERE

Friday, January 13, 2017

Blurble Card Game in Action



Blurble is the hilarious word-association card game that is great for all ages or group sizes. Flip a card and be the first to say a word that starts with the same letter as the image on the card. Proper nouns, numbers, and words with fewer than three letters are not allowed. The player with the most cards at the end is the winner. How fast do you Blurble?

Blurble is available at Mozart, Einstein & Me!

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Can You Solve the Counterfeit Coin Riddle? - Jennifer Lu


You’re the realm’s greatest mathematician, but ever since you criticized the Emperor’s tax laws, you’ve been locked in the dungeon. Luckily for you, one of the Emperor’s governors has been convicted of paying his taxes with a counterfeit coin, which has made its way into the treasury. Can you earn your freedom by finding the fake? Jennifer Lu shows how.

Lesson by Jennifer Lu, animation by Artrake Studio.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Rhythm & West African Percussion Classes Start January 23rd!


START: Mondays January 23rd - February 20th, 7pm-8pm

These classes are a fun and easy way to improve one’s rhythmic skills while fostering a musical groundwork to last a lifetime and build community at the same time. Drums provided!

Classes are held at Mozart, Einstein & Me: 2156 First Street, Livermore, CA.

Call 925-443-1244 for info and to register, or visit www.holisticdrum.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

5 Top Reasons for Getting Your Kids Involved in Music Lessons


When I tell someone that I teach piano, the initial response I get is, "I wish I had taken piano lessons when I was younger" or "I wish my mom forced me to continue piano lessons rather than letting me quit." Since I started teaching in 1992, no one has ever said, "I wish I hadn't learned how to play the piano."As adults and parents, we seem to understand how essential and beneficial learning to play an instrument is in our childhood and adolescent years.

Parents have various reasons for investing in music lessons for their kids. One of the main reasons is parents' belief that music lessons will help their kids in school. And they are right! This is one of the 5 top reasons why kids need to learn a musical instrument. As shown by research, taking music lessons has numerous benefits especially in the development of intelligence and character.

Here are 5 Top Reasons getting your kids involved in music lessons.

1. Music Lessons Enhance Brain Development.
Many research studies have been conducted to measure the effects of learning a music instrument on cognitive development. Findings indicate that children who take music lessons over several years show greater improvement in spatial-temporal reasoning skills which are necessary for learning math and science. Music-making kids surpass their classmates who don't take lessons in reading comprehension. In addition, children who take music lessons benefit from improved memory skills. When we look at the research, it is easy to see that taking music lessons over a prolonged period gives kids an academic advantage to the point of increasing IQ and SAT scores. Your kids will be smarter!

2. Music Lessons teach kids how to Accomplish Goals.
Setting goals is crucial to making progress in anything that we pursue whether it's a passion or not. Typically, if we are passionate about something, we pursue that "something" by setting our own goals. Many times others set goals for us including our parents, teachers, bosses, coaches, government, religious leaders or peers. Goal-setting is an important part of day-to-day living, and it is the first step toward achieving a sense of accomplishment. Proficiency on an instrument is a long-term goal achieved over a period of years. In order to accomplish this goal, the music teacher and student must set and accomplish short-term goals that will ultimately lead to long-term achievement. One of the greatest rewards of being a music teacher is to help young students become top-notch musicians and performers over the course of their elementary through high school years. Some students go on to pursue music as a career path. Others go on to pursue other passions. Whatever their pursuits, taking music lessons has taught them how to make progress towards their dreams.

3. Music Lessons develop Self-Discipline in kids.
We all know that anything worth having in this life doesn't come easy and that with hard work and consistency we can achieve great things. How do we instill the character qualities of self-determination and discipline in our kids who are living in a fast-paced society that has grown accustomed to immediate gratification? Music lessons are a fun and effective way to help a child learn self-discipline. Students find motivation in the music they are learning. However, in order to perform this music well they must practice consistently. As the music teacher helps a student structure weekly practice time, the student is empowered to learn the music through self-discipline. Developing the skill of self-discipline can be adapted to achieve goals in other areas such as academics and sports.

4. Music Lessons help kids become Independent and Self-Sufficient adults.
Many child psychologists agree that a child's happiness and ability to become an independent and successful adult is greatly dependent on that child's sense of self-worth and confidence. The qualities of children with high self-esteem include:

• tackling new challenges
• being independent and true to themselves
• taking responsibility for their decisions and actions
• having confidence in themselves and taking pride in their abilities

These characteristics can be developed with consistent music lessons throughout the childhood and adolescent years. New challenges are tackled regularly in music lessons by learning a new piece or song, learning a new technique or progressing to a higher skill level. As students make progress in learning a musical instrument, they are able to choose the music they love to perform - classical, pop, country, etc. Being true to yourself is recognizing what you love most and pursuing it. The decision to practice or not practice can have its consequences, and students must structure their practice for progress. Seeing students perform in front of an audience is a highlight for teachers, parents, family and friends. Students experience a great sense of accomplishment after a performance.

5. Music Lessons promote Self-Expression and Creativity
The world's greatest leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators and inventors have something in common - creativity. This creativity can evolve into the power of invention. Think of Benjamin Franklin and his numerous inventions that were born from his creativity in discovering improvements to the way things worked. Making music naturally elicits self-expression and creativity, and the ability for students to express themselves with confidence and creativity opens up incredible doors of opportunity.

As you think about which extracurricular activities to choose for your kids, consider the true benefits of your investment. We all want our children to live life to the fullest and to experience great happiness as they follow their dreams. Sometimes, they need a little guidance from us. We invest in our kids' futures by giving them opportunities such as music lessons. Taking music lessons cultivates qualities that lead to lifetime success. Make learning a music instrument a priority in your home and encourage your kids every step of the way.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Allison_J_Boyd

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6546449

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Happy New Year!


Today is the first blank page of a 365 page book. Write a good one.

Have a Happy New Year!