Sunday, December 30, 2018

The Music of Marimbas


A mallet instrument that traces its roots to Africa, the name marimba in the Central African language of Bantu means "wood that sings." Problem is, that wood is running out; Honduran Rosewood, responsible for the unique sound of the marimba, is grown only in a few parts of Central America, and in 2008 the tree was added to the Endangered Species List. Serena Altschul gets some percussion lessons, and talks with experts intent on making sure this ever-evolving instrument continues to sing.

Friday, December 28, 2018

Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Merry Christmas!


May the holiday season end the present year on a cheerful note and make way for a fresh and bright New Year. Merry Christmas!

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Introducing Mozart's Clarinet


"This is the clarinet that Mozart would have expected to hear when he wrote for it."

Our Principal Clarinet Antony Pay takes us through the staple instrument of the time - the 5 key clarinet, and shows us the type of basset clarinet he believes enables you to play Mozart's Clarinet Concerto best.

Thursday, December 20, 2018

Can You Solve the Troll’s Paradox Riddle? - Dan Finkel


You and your brother have discovered another realm and set off exploring the new wonderful world. Along the way, you see a troll catching creatures in an enormous net. The troll agrees to release the creatures if you can come up with a statement that is both truth and false. Can you come up with the correct sentence and force the troll to release them? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio.

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

This Is Your Brain On Music - How Music Benefits The Brain


Music has been an important part of every human culture, both past and present. It can play a part in brain development, learning, mood, and even your health.

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Why Is Blue So Rare In Nature?


Among living things, the color blue is oddly rare. Blue rocks, blue sky, blue water, sure. But blue animals? They are few and far between. And the ones that do make blue? They make it in some very strange and special ways compared to other colors. In this video, we'll look at some very cool butterflies to help us learn how living things make blue, and why this beautiful hue is so rare in nature.

Friday, December 14, 2018

The Life Cycle of a Neutron Star - David Lunney


About once every century, a massive star somewhere in our galaxy runs out of fuel. No longer able to produce sufficient energy to maintain its structure, it collapses under its own gravitational pressure and explodes in a supernova. The death of that star is the birth of a neutron star: one of the densest known objects in the universe. David Lunney explores what, exactly, a neutron star is.

Lesson by David Lunney, directed by JodyPrody.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Brain Teasers | Brain Games


Comedian Ben Bailey is quizzing people's common sense with a few trick questions. Think you can't be fooled? Listen carefully and play along to find out how you fare.

Monday, December 10, 2018

Can You Solve the Time Travel Riddle? - Dan Finkel


Your professor has accidentally stepped through a time portal in his physics lab. You’ve got just a minute to jump through before it closes and leaves him stranded in history. Your only way back is to grab enough colored nodules to create a new portal to open a doorway through time. Can you take the right amount of nodules to get back to the present before the portal closes? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio.

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Mercury 101 | National Geographic


The planet Mercury is named after the messenger of the Roman gods because of its fleeting nature across the sky. Find out the reason behind its incredible speed, if it is indeed the hottest planet in the Solar System, and why the smallest planet in the solar system is slowly shrinking.

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Can You Solve the Giant Iron Riddle? - Alex Gendler


The family of giants you work for is throwing a fancy dinner party, but there’s a problem — the elder giant’s favorite shirt is wrinkled! To fix it, you’ll need to power up the giant iron. It needs two batteries to work, but the baby giant mixed the working battery pile with the dead pile. Can you test the batteries so that you get a working pair in seven tries or less? Alex Gendler shows how.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Artrake Studio.

Friday, November 30, 2018

How I Found Myself Through Music | Anika Paulson


"Music is everywhere, and it is in everything," says musician, student and TED-Ed Clubs star Anika Paulson. Guitar in hand, she plays through the beats of her life in an exploration of how music connects us and makes us what we are.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Mars 101 | National Geographic


From its blood-like hue to its potential to sustain life, Mars has intrigued humankind for thousands of years. Learn how the red planet formed from gas and dust and what its polar ice caps mean for life as we know it.

Monday, November 26, 2018

Who Decides What Art Means? - Hayley Levitt


There is a question that has been tossed around by philosophers and art critics for decades: how much should an artist's intention affect your interpretation of the work? Do the artist’s plans and motivations affect its meaning? Or is it completely up to the judgment of the viewer? Hayley Levitt explores the complex web of artistic interpretation.

Lesson by Hayley Levitt, directed by Avi Ofer.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

How One Designer Created the "Look" of Jazz


Blue Note captured the refined sophistication of jazz during the early 60s, giving it its signature look in the process.

When asked to visualize what jazz looks like, you might picture bold typography, two-tone photography, and minimal graphic design. If you did, you’re recalling the work of a jazz label that single-handedly defined the “look” of jazz music in the 1950s and1960s: Blue Note.

Inspired by the ever-present Swiss lettering style that defined 20th-century graphic design (think Paul Rand), Blue Note captured the refined sophistication of jazz during the early 60s, particularly during the hard bop era, and gave it a definitive visual identity through album covers.

Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs.

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Happy Thanksgiving!


May you enjoy this celebration with your family full of laughter and peace. Happy Thanksgiving greetings!

Monday, November 19, 2018

What’s the Smallest Thing in the Universe? - Jonathan Butterworth


If you were to take a coffee cup, and break it in half, then in half again, and keep carrying on, where would you end up? Could you keep on going forever? Or would you eventually find a set of indivisible building blocks out of which everything is made? Jonathan Butterworth explains the Standard Model theory and how it helps us understand the world we live in.

Lesson by Jon Butterworth, directed by Nick Hilditch.

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Saturn 101 | National Geographic


How did the rings around Saturn form? How many moons does the planet have? See stunning NASA images of the gas giant studied by Christian Huygens and Giovanni Cassini.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Jazz Deconstructed: John Coltrane's "Giant Steps"


John Coltrane, one of jazz history’s most revered saxophonists, released “Giant Steps” in 1959. It’s known across the jazz world as one of the most challenging compositions to improvise over for two reasons - it’s fast and it’s in three keys. Braxton Cook and Adam Neely give me a crash course in music theory to help me understand this notoriously difficult song, and I’m bringing you along for the ride. Even if you don’t understand a lick of music theory, you’ll likely walk away with an appreciation for this musical puzzle.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Can You Solve the Secret Werewolf Riddle? - Dan Finkel


You’re on the trail of a werewolf that’s been terrorizing your town. After months of detective work, you’ve narrowed your suspects to one of five people. You’ve invited them to dinner with a simple plan: to slip a square of a rare antidote into each of their dinners. Unfortunately, you only have one square left. Can you divide it into perfect fifths and cure the werewolf? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Pluto 101 | National Geographic


Pluto is one of the most mysterious and controversial celestial objects in the solar system. Find out what most mystifies scientists and stargazers about this dwarf planet.

Friday, November 9, 2018

Music and Confidence | Benefits of Music


'One of the most important things for being successful in life is having high levels of self-belief...music can provide that self-belief'

Dr. Susan Hallam, Emerita Professor of Education and Music Psychology, on the benefits of taking part in music.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How Far Would You Have to Go to Escape Gravity? - Rene Laufer


Every star, black hole, human being, smartphone and atom are all constantly pulling on each other due to one force: gravity. So why don’t we feel pulled in billions of different directions? And is there anywhere in the universe where we'd be free of its pull? Rene Laufer details the inescapability of gravity.

Lesson by Rene Laufer, directed by TED-Ed.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Top 10 Strangest Musical Instruments


You’ve probably never heard of these instruments, but wait until you hear the incredible sounds they can create! Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be taking a look at our picks for the top 10 Strangest Musical instruments. From the Earth Harp, to the Octobass, Marble Machine, Hurdy Gurdy and Sharpischord to the Pikasso Guitar, Theremin, Hydralophone and the Great Stalacpipe organ, they’re all here! Did your favorite strange instrument make it onto the list?

Friday, November 2, 2018

How Rollercoasters Affect Your Body - Brian D. Avery


In 1895, crowds flooded Coney Island to see America’s first-ever looping coaster: the Flip Flap Railway. But its thrilling flip caused cases of severe whiplash, neck injury and even ejections. Today, coasters can pull off far more exciting tricks and do it safely. Brian D. Avery investigates what rollercoasters are doing to your body and how they’ve managed to get scarier and safer at the same time.

Lesson by Brian D. Avery, directed by Stretch Films Inc.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Why We Say “OK”


OK is thought to be the most widely recognized word on the planet. We use it to communicate with each other, as well as our technology. But it actually started out as a language fad in the 1830’s of abbreviating words incorrectly.

Young intellectuals in Boston came up with several of these abbreviations, including “KC” for “knuff ced,” “OW” for “oll wright,” and KY for “know yuse.” But thanks to its appearance in Martin Van Buren’s 1840 presidential re-election campaign as the incumbents new nickname, Old Kinderhook, OK outlived its abbreviated comrades.

Later, widespread use by early telegraph operators caused OK to go mainstream, and its original purpose as a neutral affirmative is still how we use it today.

Sunday, October 28, 2018

Venus 101 | National Geographic


Named after the ancient Roman goddess of beauty, Venus is known for its exceptional brightness. Find out about the volcanoes that dot Venus's surface, the storms that rage in its atmosphere, and the surprising feature that makes Venus outshine every planet or star in the night sky.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Music and Emotions | Benefits of Music


"In one study we did recently, there had been some older people who had been on medication for depression for many years. They joined a choir or instrumental group and spent some time actively making music with other people. After a few weeks, they felt able to throw their medication away."

Dr Susan Hallam, Emerita Professor of Education and Music Psychology, on the benefits of taking part in music.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Does Time Exist? - Andrew Zimmerman Jones


The earliest time measurements were observations of cycles of the natural world, using patterns of changes from day to night and season to season to build calendars. More precise time-keeping eventually came along to put time in more convenient boxes. But what exactly are we measuring? Andrew Zimmerman Jones contemplates whether time is something that physically exists or is just in our heads.

Lesson by Andrew Zimmerman Jones, directed by Nice Shoes.

Saturday, October 20, 2018

How Your Eyes Make Sense of the World | Decoder


How does the eye work exactly? In the latest video from Decoder, learn some of the extraordinary science behind how your eyes and brain work together to perceive the world around you.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Why Can't Some Birds Fly? - Gillian Gibb


Though the common ancestor of all modern birds could fly, many different bird species have independently lost their flight. Flight can have incredible benefits, especially for escaping predators, hunting and traveling long distances. But it also has high costs: consuming huge amounts of energy and limiting body size and weight. Gillian Gibb explores what makes birds give up the power of flight.

Lesson by Gillian Gibb, directed by Anton Bogaty.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

The Neurology of Music


Dr. Aniruddh Patel of The Neurosciences Institute walks us through what happens in the brain when listening to music, and how music stimulates a multitude of the brain’s regions.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

How Noise Pollution is Ruining Your Hearing


Our ears are exposed to dangerous levels of noise every single day.

Health organizations warn that continual exposure to noise levels above 70 decibels can potentially damage your ears. And yet we are routinely exposed to noise much louder than that in everyday situations.

Our world is increasingly noisy and our bars, restaurants, gyms, and streets all produce decibel levels that can cause harm to our hearing in mere minutes.

Hearing loss is incredibly common and is the fourth highest disability worldwide. One in four American adults shows signs of noise-induced hearing loss, and the problem is only going to get worse.

While hearing damage is irreversible, it's also completely preventable. Watch for tips on how to protect your ears even in incredibly loud environments.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Can You Solve the Killer Robo-Ants Riddle? - Dan Finkel


The good news is that your experimental robo-ants are a success. The bad news is that you accidentally gave them the ability to shoot deadly lasers … and you can’t turn it off. Can you stop them from escaping their habitat before the lasers are activated? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Coolest Concert Ever? Hear Ice Instruments Play Beautiful Music | Short Film Showcase


Peek into the magical world of Ice Music in this short film from P2 Photography. Introduced by American ice sculptor Tim Linhart, musicians play hand-carved ice instruments inside a glowing igloo concert hall.

Sunday, October 7, 2018

How Music Affects Your Mood


Menzie Pittman, a member of the National Association of Music Merchants, talks about the different ways music affects your mood

Friday, October 5, 2018

A One-Man Musical Phenomenon | Jacob Collier


Jacob Collier is a one-man band and force of nature. In a dynamic, colorful performance, he recreates the magical room at his home in London where he produces music, performing three songs in which he sings every part and plays every instrument -- accompanied by kaleidoscopic visuals that take cues from the music and grow in real time.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Musical Highway | Crowd Control


Road contractors engineered an ingenious and melodic way to encourage drivers to obey the speed limit.

Saturday, September 29, 2018

How a Recording-Studio Mishap Shaped '80s Music


Over the past few years a general nostalgia for the 1980s has infiltrated music, film, and television. I deeply love those gated reverb drums of the '80s - you know that punchy percussive sound popularized by Phil Collins and Prince? So for my second episode of Vox Pop’s Earworm I spoke with two Berklee College of Music professors, Susan Rogers, and Prince Charles Alexander, to figure out just how that sound came to be, what makes it so damn punchy, and why it’s back.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Can You Solve the Alien Probe Riddle? - Dan Finkel


Your team has developed a probe to study an alien monolith. It needs protective coatings — in red, purple or green — to cope with the environments it passes through. Can you figure out how to apply the colors so the probe survives the trip? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Anton Trofimov.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

4 Powerful Benefits Of Learning a Musical Instrument After 50


When you think of a “typical” music student, you might picture a 7-year-old girl, sitting nervously in front of a piano, her tiny fingers resting lightly on the keys. Several decades ago, you may have even been that little girl. Well, if you think that musical instruments are just for kids, it’s probably time to update your soundtrack. There are plenty of reasons people over 50 should consider adding a little music to their lives.

Music is for Your Brain what Circuit Training is for Your Body

As the fitter baby boomers among us know, circuit training involves moving from one exercise machine to another, while giving ourselves a total body workout. There are very few activities that can do the same for your brain – and music is one of them.

According to researchers, most activities use only a few areas of the brain at a time. Playing a musical instrument, on the other hand, sets of a symphony of activity all over your brain.

So, if you are interested in keeping your mind sharp in the decades ahead, you may want to put down the TV remote and pick up a set of drumsticks or a violin bow.

Watch this short TEDvideo for an explanation of exactly how playing a musical instrument affects your brain.


Your Choice of Instrument is a Reflection of Your Personality

Were you forced to play a musical instrument as a child? Many of us are first introduced to playing music when we pick up our first recorder in elementary school. Others are required by, occasionally over-optimistic, parents to learn the piano or violin.

There’s nothing wrong with introducing kids to music. In fact, this is a great idea. At the same time, many of us leave childhood with apathy, if not outright distaste, for playing music. There is something about being forced to do something that steals all of the fun from the activity.

Now that you are in your 50s or 60s, you get to call the shots. Is there an instrument that you have always been fascinated with? Have you, perhaps, always wanted to play the drums? Or, did you idolize guitar players in your youth? Do you have a secret desire to be a DJ? Now is the time to turn your musical dreams into reality.

Learning an Instrument is a Great Way to Make Friends

Life after 50 can be a challenging time from a social perspective. With their kids out of the house, many baby boomers find themselves lacking the social ties that they had in other stages of their lives. In addition, many of us have gone through a divorce or lost a partner.

Learning an instrument can be a fantastic way to get out into the world and meet new people on your own terms. In the beginning, your main interaction may be with your teacher. But, after a while, you will start to meet other musicians who share a passion for your instrument or style of music.

Who knows, after several years, you may even decide to join a band or start one of your own.

Music Can Build Your Self-Esteem

Learning an instrument is one of the best ways to build your confidence. For starters, it is something that you can do from the comfort of your home, at least in the beginning. There are tons of online courses that can teach you anything from guitar to electronic music production. Every note you play will ring out as proof that you can do anything that you set your mind to.

One of the biggest myths about aging is that the older we get the less able we are to learn new things. What nonsense! This isn’t true at 70 and it certainly isn’t true at 50. So, why not add a little music to your life? Your body, brain and social life will thank you!

Article Source: http://sixtyandme.com/benefits-of-learning-a-musical-instrument-after-50/

Saturday, September 22, 2018

The Positive Psychological Effects of Music - Benefits of Making and Listening to Music


Learn about the positive benefits of listening to music and the creative psychological effects of creating music in this educational animation. Tons of people listen to hundreds of songs a day for lots of reasons, but this video will break down why we do, and reasons we should keep listening to music. Music has tons of effects on the brain, and a book title “Music and the Mind” is a great resource for more information.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Black Holes 101 | National Geographic


At the center of our galaxy, a supermassive black hole churns. Learn about the types of black holes, how they form, and how scientists discovered these invisible, yet extraordinary objects in our universe.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Can You Solve the Rebel Supplies Riddle? - Alex Gendler


You’re overseeing the delivery of supplies to a rebel base in the heart of enemy territory. To get past customs, all packages must follow this rule: if a box is marked with an even number on the bottom, it must be sealed with a red top. One of the four boxes was sealed incorrectly, but they lost track of which one. Can you figure out which box it is and save the day? Alex Gendler shows how.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Artrake Studio.

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Mozart Einstein and Me - Shop Livermore Passport


Well Dang!

Over here at Mozart Einstein & Me - Livermore CA - Livermore CA we found a real gem on 1st St!

They have so much to offer that will keep you and your kids' brains engaged and learning all the time! the staff is super friendly and knowledgeable!

They've got gifts for all ages and all interests. If you have a reason to celebrate a friends b-day or just get a lil gift swing on in and take a look at all the cool stuff!

September 10-21st Omni Fight Club will bring you the “Shop Livermore Passport” Experience!! Shop at any of the participating businesses and earn tickets to WIN amazing prices at our 2nd Anniversary Event September 22nd 6:30PM at OFCL! Visit their Facebook page HERE for more info.

#ShopLivermorePassport
#FunToughFitness
#SupportLocalBusiness

Friday, September 14, 2018

Livermore's 2nd Anniversary Bash & Local Business Expo


Celebrate Livermore Omni Fight Club's 2nd Anniversary Celebration & Local Business Expo:

This will be a full day of events for the community, starting with a morning Saturday workout sampler (open to everyone) and then followed by a Shop Downtown Passport Contest, a small business expo and an evening that includes food, music and dancing.

Super Saturday workout sampler with Joya Yoga & Cycle from 9am - 12pmParticipants will experience 15 minute rounds of each class including; kickboxing, strength training cycle, barre, aerial yoga & inferno Pilates. Transition time will be 3 minutes between each exercise. Participants are not required to complete any of the rounds or go in any specific order. The focus is on having FUN and the opportunity to experience all we have offer.

Fun Fit Kids will be open from 8:30 - 12:30pm and again in the evening from 5- 8pm.

Shop Livermore Downtown Passport Contest (full list of participating locations below)

From September 10th - 21st, shop at any participating local retailer, check in on their Facebook page and validate your passport at as many businesses as possible. Each shopping experience will earn additional tickets for the grand prize drawing. Local Business Expo 5pm - 6:30pm

30+ local businesses will be showcasing their products and services.Purple Orchid Resort and spa will provide free 15 minute Ashi & 10 minute chair massages. Book your free reservation online through MindBody.

2nd Anniversary Celebration from 6:00 - 11:30pm(Family Friendly with childcare available from Fun Fit Kids, 5-8pm)

We are excited to celebrate our 2nd year in the Livermore community. We are bringing our local partners together for an evening to remember. DJ Robbie Rich from Amos productions will be keeping you dancing from the ring inside while Ten Tuesday's brings the party to the outdoor stage. Beer Barron will be serving dinner and drinks with two full bars, a choice whisky list and 6 Altamont Beers on tap. Service will start at 6:30pm. The Steamhouse will be converted into the Steam Lounge for the evening with mellow music and a place to chill and connect with friends.

**All pre registered Omni Fight Club, Joya Yoga and Yoga Fight Club members will receive 2 free drinks**

After party will take place at Beer Barron in Livermore from 11:30pm.

Find a List of All Shop Livermore Downtown Passport Contest Participants HERE

Article Source: https://patch.com/california/livermore/calendar/event/20180922/409704/livermores-2nd-anniversary-bash-local-business-expo

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

How Trees Secretly Talk to Each Other in the Forest | National Geographic


What do trees talk about? In the Douglas fir forests of Canada, see how trees “talk” to each other by forming underground symbiotic relationships—called mycorrhizae—with fungi to relay stress signals and share resources with one another.

Monday, September 10, 2018

The Benefits of Taking Part in Music


The benefits of music are endless! One of the areas that it can make a difference to is physical and coordination.

Saturday, September 8, 2018

What is Imposter Syndrome and How Can You Combat It? - Elizabeth Cox


Even after writing eleven books and winning several awards, Maya Angelou couldn’t escape the doubt that she hadn’t earned her accomplishments. This feeling of fraudulence is extremely common. Why can’t so many of us shake feelings that our ideas and skills aren’t worthy of others’ attention? Elizabeth Cox describes the psychology behind the imposter syndrome, and what you can do to combat it. 

Lesson by Elizabeth Cox, directed by Sharon Colman.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Sun 101 | National Geographic


The sun keeps the planets in its orbit with a tremendous gravitational force. What would happen if it disappeared entirely? Learn about the star at the center of our solar system, and how it is critical to all life as we know it.

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Will We Ever Be Able to Teleport? - Sajan Saini


Is teleportation possible? Could a baseball transform into something like a radio wave, travel through buildings, bounce around corners, and change back into a baseball? Oddly enough, thanks to quantum mechanics, the answer might actually be yes... sort of! Sajan Saini explains.

Lesson by Sajan Saini, directed by Karrot Animation.

Sunday, September 2, 2018

Friday, August 31, 2018

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Which is Stronger: Glue or Tape? - Elizabeth Cox


The oldest glue in the world is over 8,000 years old and comes from a cave near the Dead Sea. Today, we have enough types of tape and glue to build and repair almost anything. But what gives glue and tape their stickiness? And is one stronger than the other? Elizabeth Cox explores the world of adhesives.

Lesson by Elizabeth Cox, animation by Sinbad Richardson.

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Can You Solve the Leonardo da Vinci Riddle? - Tanya Khovanova


You’ve found Leonardo da Vinci’s secret vault, secured by a series of combination locks. Fortunately, your treasure map has three codes: 1210, 3211000, and… hmm. The last one appears to be missing. Can you figure out the last number and open the vault? Tanya Khovanova shows how.

Lesson by Tanya Khovanova, directed by Artrake Studio.

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Health Benefits for Seniors Learning to Play Musical Instruments


Researchers at the Western Sydney University's MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development say even a small amount of musical training can have long-lasting effects, particularly for seniors.

They say playing a musical instrument in retirement is one of the best ways to stay mentally and physically agile.

Music and psychology researcher with the institute, Dr Jennifer MacRitchie, has been studying the benefits of learning an instrument for the first time in people aged over 65, with her most recent study focusing on the piano.

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Top 10 Iconic Pieces of Classical Music


They’re the definition of classic. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 iconic pieces of classical music.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

How Do Birds Learn to Sing? - Partha P. Mitra


A brown thrasher knows a thousand songs. A wood thrush can sing two pitches at once. A mockingbird can match the sounds around it — including car alarms. These are just a few of the 4,000 species of songbirds. How do these birds learn songs? How do they know to mimic the songs of their own species? Are they born knowing how to sing? Partha P. Mitra illuminates the beautiful world of birdsong.

Lesson by Partha P. Mitra, animation by TED-Ed.

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Top 10 Cool Musical Instruments


For this list, we're ranking musical instruments which either possess a notion of coolness or are the chosen instrument for a particularly cool musician.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Brain Magic - The Common Sense Illusion | Brain Games


Your common sense might tell you there's more than meets the eye to illusionist Eric Leclerc's magic trick. And you'd be right.

Friday, August 10, 2018

Can You Solve the Rogue AI Riddle? - Dan Finkel


A hostile artificial intelligence called NIM has taken over the world’s computers. You’re the only person skilled enough to shut it down, and you’ll only have one chance. Can you survive and shut off the artificial intelligence? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Artrake Studio.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

10 Songs You've Heard and Don't Know the Name


I played 10 songs that you've heard and don't know the name. In fact, no one knows their names. Learn on this video.

Monday, August 6, 2018

The Science of Hearing - Douglas L. Oliver


The ability to recognize sounds and identify their location is possible thanks to the auditory system. That’s comprised of two main parts: the ear, and the brain. The ear’s task is to convert sound energy into neural signals; the brain’s is to receive and process the information those signals contain. To understand how that works, Douglas L. Oliver follows a sound on its journey into the ear.

Lesson by Douglas L. Oliver, animation by Cabong Studios.

Saturday, August 4, 2018

What a Conductor Actually Does on Stage


If you’ve ever seen an orchestra perform you’ve probably had a difficult time looking away from the person dead center on the stage – the conductor. It’s hard to miss someone as they swing their arms around pointing at the musicians that seem to be focused instead on their music stands. So what exactly is the conductor doing?

We decided to ask James Gaffigan – a conductor who recently guest conducted the New York Philharmonic in Central Park – just what it is that makes a conductor so necessary and how their actions shape the performance.

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Moon 101 | National Geographic


What is the moon made of, and how did it form? Learn about the moon's violent origins, how its phases shaped the earliest calendars, and how humans first explored Earth's only natural satellite half a century ago.

Monday, July 30, 2018

How Can You Change Someone's Mind? (Hint: Facts Aren't Always Enough) - Hugo Mercier


Why do arguments change people’s minds in some cases and backfire in others? Hugo Mercier explains how arguments are more convincing when they rest on a good knowledge of the audience, taking into account what the audience believes, who they trust, and what they value.

Lesson by Hugo Mercier, animation by TED-Ed.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Are the Brains of Musicians Physically Different?


Charles Limb, MD discusses the functional and morphological differences between the brains of musicians and non-musicians.

An excerpt from "Music & the Mind: The Magical Power of Sound " featuring Steve Paulson, Jamshed Bharucha, Concetta Tomaino, Charles Limb, and Vijay Iyer.

The New York Academy of Sciences
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Why More Pop Songs Should End with a Fade Out


The fade out is underrated. It should come back.

The fade out in music is one of those necessary tools in a record producers arsenal. But if you listen to today's hits it's much more likely you'll hear a song that has a hard abrupt electronic ending. Bill Weir, wrote a great piece at Slate a few years ago tracking the rise and fall of the fade out in pop music: from one of the very first fade outs created by a literal wooden door to the epic 4 minute fade out of "Hey Jude." In the video above he brings me through that sonic journey.

Sunday, July 22, 2018

How Exactly Does Binary Code Work? - José Américo N L F de Freitas


Imagine trying to use words to describe every scene in a film, every note in a song, or every street in your town. Now imagine trying to do it using only the numbers 1 and 0. Every time you use the Internet to watch a movie, listen to music, or check directions, that’s exactly what your device is doing, using the language of binary code. José Américo N L F de Freitas explains how binary works.

Lesson by José Américo N L F de Freitas, animation by Qa'ed Mai.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Inside The Mind Of Jaxon Cota An 11-Year-Old Kid Genius | NBC Nightly News


At age nine, Jaxon Cota was accepted into Mensa, a society for geniuses. His IQ puts him in the top two percent of the world, but despite his smarts, Jaxon isn’t rushing ahead.

Monday, July 16, 2018

What is the Coldest Thing in the World? - Lina Marieth Hoyos


The coldest materials in the world aren’t in Antarctica or at the top of Mount Everest. They’re in physics labs: clouds of gases held just fractions of a degree above absolute zero. Lina Marieth Hoyos explains how temperatures this low give scientists a window into the inner workings of matter, and allow engineers to build incredibly sensitive instruments that tell us more about the universe.

Lesson by Lina Marieth Hoyos, animation by Adriatic Animation.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

5 Top Reasons for Getting Your Kids Involved in Music Lessons


When I tell someone that I teach piano, the initial response I get is, "I wish I had taken piano lessons when I was younger" or "I wish my mom forced me to continue piano lessons rather than letting me quit." Since I started teaching in 1992, no one has ever said, "I wish I hadn't learned how to play the piano."As adults and parents, we seem to understand how essential and beneficial learning to play an instrument is in our childhood and adolescent years.

Parents have various reasons for investing in music lessons for their kids. One of the main reasons is parents' belief that music lessons will help their kids in school. And they are right! This is one of the 5 top reasons why kids need to learn a musical instrument. As shown by research, taking music lessons has numerous benefits especially in the development of intelligence and character.

Here are 5 Top Reasons getting your kids involved in music lessons.

1. Music Lessons Enhance Brain Development.
Many research studies have been conducted to measure the effects of learning a music instrument on cognitive development. Findings indicate that children who take music lessons over several years show greater improvement in spatial-temporal reasoning skills which are necessary for learning math and science. Music-making kids surpass their classmates who don't take lessons in reading comprehension. In addition, children who take music lessons benefit from improved memory skills. When we look at the research, it is easy to see that taking music lessons over a prolonged period gives kids an academic advantage to the point of increasing IQ and SAT scores. Your kids will be smarter!

2. Music Lessons teach kids how to Accomplish Goals.
Setting goals is crucial to making progress in anything that we pursue whether it's a passion or not. Typically, if we are passionate about something, we pursue that "something" by setting our own goals. Many times others set goals for us including our parents, teachers, bosses, coaches, government, religious leaders or peers. Goal-setting is an important part of day-to-day living, and it is the first step toward achieving a sense of accomplishment. Proficiency on an instrument is a long-term goal achieved over a period of years. In order to accomplish this goal, the music teacher and student must set and accomplish short-term goals that will ultimately lead to long-term achievement. One of the greatest rewards of being a music teacher is to help young students become top-notch musicians and performers over the course of their elementary through high school years. Some students go on to pursue music as a career path. Others go on to pursue other passions. Whatever their pursuits, taking music lessons has taught them how to make progress towards their dreams.

3. Music Lessons develop Self-Discipline in kids.
We all know that anything worth having in this life doesn't come easy and that with hard work and consistency we can achieve great things. How do we instill the character qualities of self-determination and discipline in our kids who are living in a fast-paced society that has grown accustomed to immediate gratification? Music lessons are a fun and effective way to help a child learn self-discipline. Students find motivation in the music they are learning. However, in order to perform this music well they must practice consistently. As the music teacher helps a student structure weekly practice time, the student is empowered to learn the music through self-discipline. Developing the skill of self-discipline can be adapted to achieve goals in other areas such as academics and sports.

4. Music Lessons help kids become Independent and Self-Sufficient adults.
Many child psychologists agree that a child's happiness and ability to become an independent and successful adult is greatly dependent on that child's sense of self-worth and confidence. The qualities of children with high self-esteem include:

• tackling new challenges
• being independent and true to themselves
• taking responsibility for their decisions and actions
• having confidence in themselves and taking pride in their abilities

These characteristics can be developed with consistent music lessons throughout the childhood and adolescent years. New challenges are tackled regularly in music lessons by learning a new piece or song, learning a new technique or progressing to a higher skill level. As students make progress in learning a musical instrument, they are able to choose the music they love to perform - classical, pop, country, etc. Being true to yourself is recognizing what you love most and pursuing it. The decision to practice or not practice can have its consequences, and students must structure their practice for progress. Seeing students perform in front of an audience is a highlight for teachers, parents, family and friends. Students experience a great sense of accomplishment after a performance.

5. Music Lessons promote Self-Expression and Creativity
The world's greatest leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators and inventors have something in common - creativity. This creativity can evolve into the power of invention. Think of Benjamin Franklin and his numerous inventions that were born from his creativity in discovering improvements to the way things worked. Making music naturally elicits self-expression and creativity, and the ability for students to express themselves with confidence and creativity opens up incredible doors of opportunity.

As you think about which extracurricular activities to choose for your kids, consider the true benefits of your investment. We all want our children to live life to the fullest and to experience great happiness as they follow their dreams. Sometimes, they need a little guidance from us. We invest in our kids' futures by giving them opportunities such as music lessons. Taking music lessons cultivates qualities that lead to lifetime success. Make learning a music instrument a priority in your home and encourage your kids every step of the way.


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Thursday, July 12, 2018

Mini BIO - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart learned the piano at the age of three, and soon developed his skills in all musical forms. Widely recognized as one of the greatest composers of all time, he produced over 600 works.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

What Would it be Like to Live on the Moon? - Alex Gendler


The European Space Agency is hoping to establish an inhabited research base on the moon by the 2020s. But living in this "moon camp" won’t be easy. How will humans deal with the cosmic radiation? What will the inhabitants eat? And what's the point, anyway? Alex Gendler details the challenges and benefits of building a lunar colony.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Allen Laseter.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

6 Benefits Of Music - How Music Can Help


Everywhere you look, (or I guess listen), music is all around us. It's on the television we watch, the commercials trying to sell us something and in all forms of entertainment you can think of. The use of music to infuse a particular feeling or emotion is abundant and effective everywhere.

Music as a sales tool is well known and powerful, but what about using music as a form of therapy? If commercials and television can project a certain feeling with it, then why can't we use it to invoke the same response for ourselves in a positive manner?

When going through a divorce, music played a large role in helping me feel better. At the time, it didn't matter how, but playing music made me feel better, so that's what I did. I listened to it, which encouraged me to learn it. The more I practiced, the more it helped me feel better.

There are many different ways in which music can assist in getting through difficult times. And many of those qualities can help anyone struggling with change.

Reduces Stress: Some music when listened to can help reduce stress and anxiety. Listening to soft, soothing music is often used in the practice of meditation to help calm the mind.

Helps With Depression: Depression can be a very debilitating stage we go through when recovering from some loss. Listening to music can release endorphins, making us feel better, even if it's just a little, it can help bring you up.

Builds Confidence: When taking music to the next level, like learning how to play the guitar, the benefits of music become more intense. Learning something new can do great things for your confidence, very useful when times are tough.

Teaches Discipline: Once again, when taking on an activity like learning the guitar, discipline is needed in order to advance with it. In order to get better at playing an instrument, you need to practice and discipline assists in keeping you motivated to practice.

Promotes Teamwork: If you enjoy playing and become confident with it, you may start looking at joining a band. When joining to play with others, teamwork is essential in having a successful partnership.

Social Outlet: Music has always been the center of social gatherings. It's an opportunity for people to have something to discuss and share experiences with. From the big arena to the small venue down the street, music brings people together socially.

Music plays a critical role in our lives, from how we feel about ourselves to being around others with the same interest. When looking for something to help bring some interest back into your life, music can be an excellent opportunity to learn and discover more about yourself.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Scott_Dziadul

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Thursday, July 5, 2018

How Music Can Heal Our Brain and Heart | Kathleen M. Howland


Music therapy is an ancient and yet very modern practice that has the power to heal and transform our brains and bodies in significant ways. Kathleen Howland, speech language and music therapist explains how music really does have the power to heal our brain and heart.

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Brain Networking among Musicians | Tomorrow Today


When musicians play, what is happening inside their brains? Scientists at Berlin's Max Planck Institute for Human Development have discovered that while performing together, their neurological activity goes into a kind of synchronization mode - almost as though they were connected by a wireless network.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Can You Solve the Mondrian Squares Riddle? - Gordon Hamilton


Dutch artist Piet Mondrian’s abstract, rectangular paintings inspired mathematicians to create a two-fold challenge. Can you solve the puzzle and get to the lowest score possible? Gordon Hamilton shows how.

Lesson by Gordon Hamilton, directed by Anton Trofimov.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Benefits of Music Therapy in Fighting Depression


At Newport Academy, teens learn to acknowledge and express their deep-rooted emotions through making and listening to music, and spend time playing music together.

Saturday, June 23, 2018

What Causes Insomnia? - Dan Kwartler


What keeps you up at night? Pondering deep questions? Excitement about a big trip? Stress about unfinished work? What if the very thing keeping you awake was stress about losing sleep? This seemingly unsolvable loop is at the heart of insomnia, the world’s most common sleep disorder. So what is insomnia? And is there any way to break the cycle? Dan Kwartler details the science of insomnia.

Lesson by Dan Kwartler, animation by Sharon Colman.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Why Do People Like Sad Music


Research from the Tokyo University of the Arts and the RIKEN Brain Science Institute, shows that listening to sad music might make people feel happier.

Sad music is just as popular as happy music - but why?

Research from the Tokyo University of the Arts and the RIKEN Brain Science Institute, shows that listening to sad music might make people feel happier.

The researchers played two sad songs and one happier sounding song, and had the subjects rate how the songs emotionally affected them.

The songs were also played with switched keys, having the major key pieces played in a minor key and vice versa.

Professor Ai Kawakami, who worked on the study wrote: "Music that is perceived as sad actually induces romantic emotion as well as sad emotion. And people, regardless of their musical training, experience this ambivalent emotion to listen to the sad music."

When people listen to music they are also aware that it is not reality, but an artistic interpretation of emotion rather than a true life event, like being emotionally affected by a tragic play or film.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Can You Solve the Giant Cat Army Riddle? - Dan Finkel


The villainous Dr. Schrödinger has developed a growth ray and intends to create an army of giant cats to terrorize the city. Your team of secret agents has tracked him to his underground lab. You burst in to find… that it’s a trap! Can you escape from Dr. Schrödinger’s lair and save the day? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, animation by Artrake Studio.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

There Are Many Benefits to Learning an Instrument


There are so many advantages to learning to play an instrument. The benefits are many, and can carry many years into your life. Whether young or old, it is a worthwhile investment of our time to undertake the fun task of learning to play.

First of all, the research shows that exposing children to music, and music training, can improve a childs' reading age, their IQ, and it affects the development of certain areas of the brain. Adults who learn and practice an instrument, are helping their minds to stay alert and focused. And there is evidence that it helps the memory.

Those who practice an instrument are teaching themselves to be disciplined as well. For you must set aside time to work on your new skills, which can be rewarding and fun in itself. And self-discipline is an area every person can use improvement in. And carries into every other area of our lives. Music can be a great way to relieve stress. We have all had those days that our stress level is elevated, and the right song can soothe us, and help to relieve some stress. And there is something even better about hearing that music come from an instrument that you are playing.

There is a great sense of achievement in playing tunes on your own instrument. It may not happen overnight, but the dedication and work involved adds to the great feeling you get when that music comes to life by your own hands. Yes, it is hard work, but it is also a lot of fun. And it is very rewarding as well.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Waters

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Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Can You Solve the Penniless Pilgrim Riddle? - Daniel Finkel


After months of travel, you’ve arrived at Duonia, home to the famous temple that’s the destination of your pilgrimage. The walk from the welcome center to the temple isn't a long one ... but there’s a problem. Can you outsmart the city's imposed tax and make it to the temple without paying a fee? Daniel Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Daniel Finkel, animation by Artrake Studio.

Sunday, June 10, 2018

The Benefits of Music: Sound, Language & Memory


There is evidence that shows parallels between how we process music and the way we process language. The benefits of music are endless!

Friday, June 8, 2018

Why Every American Graduation Plays the Same Song


We're all familiar with Pomp & Circumstance, the graduation song that's the official soundtrack of almost every commencement. But how did it get so big? In this episode of Vox's Almanac, Phil Edwards investigates and finds diamonds, war, and Dame Clara Butt.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Why is There No Saxophone in the Orchestra?


The saxophone is one of the most popular instruments, so why is it not a regular in the orchestra? Contrary to what some people say, it's not because the sax "doesn't blend" - in fact, it was designed with blending in mind, and blends fantastically well with almost any instrument. The real reasons are largely historical to do with the cartel-like world of Parisian instrument manufacturers in the 19th Century, and the effect this had on the instrument's perception over the next 100 years.

Sunday, June 3, 2018

How to Stay Calm Under Pressure - Noa Kageyama and Pen-Pen Chen


Your favorite athlete closes in for a win; the crowd holds its breath, and at the crucial moment ... she misses the shot. That competitor just experienced the phenomenon known as “choking,” where despite months, even years, of practice, a person fails right when it matters most. Why does this happen, and what can we do to avoid it? Noa Kageyama and Pen-Pen Chen explain why we choke under pressure. 

Lesson by Noa Kageyama and Pen-Pen Chen, animation by Olesya Shchukina.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Musician Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty ft. Jacob Collier & Herbie Hancock | WIRED


23-year-old musician, composer and multi-instrumentalist Jacob Collier explains the concept of harmony to 5 different people; a child, a teen, a college student, a professional, and jazz legend Herbie Hancock.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

The Benefits of Music: Bonding


There is evidence that moving to music and making music together, seems to have an impact on our bonding with other people. The benefits of music are endless!

Monday, May 28, 2018

Can You Solve the Wizard Standoff Riddle? - Dan Finkel


You’ve been chosen as a champion to represent your wizarding house in a deadly duel against two rival magic schools. Your opponents are a powerful sorcerer who wields a wand that can turn people into fish, and a powerful enchantress who wields a wand that turns people into statues. Can you choose a wand and devise a strategy that ensures you will win the duel? Dan Finkel shows how.

Lesson by Dan Finkel, animation by Artrake Studio.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Summer Violin Workshop for Kids!


A course for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music. A recital will be held at the end of the course.

Ages: 7-15

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. To apply, please send your information to the email below. The instructor will contact you to schedule an audition. You may also submit an audition video of a piece and a major scale. Returning students do not need to audition. Deadline is on June 2nd, 2018.

Class size: 6-8 students

Duration of Course: 8 weeks

Schedule: Every Tuesdays from 6:00pm to 7:30pm (June 12th - July 31th ,2018)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $220.00

For more information, please contact Melissa Atienza at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Why Stradivarius Violins Are Worth Millions


Antonio Stradivari is generally considered the greatest violin maker of all time. His violins are played by some of the top musicians in the world and sell for as much as $16 million. For centuries people have puzzled over what makes his violins so great and they are the most scientifically studied instruments in history. I spoke to two world class violinists who play Stradivarius violins as well as a violin-maker about what makes Stradivari so great.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

The Journey to Pluto, the Farthest World Ever Explored - Alan Stern


As of 1989, mankind had successfully sent craft to every known planet in the solar system except one: Pluto. Located in an mysterious region called the Kuiper Belt, Pluto is a scientific goldmine, and could hold clues to the formation of our solar system. Alan Stern explains how NASA's New Horizons mission is going to allow us to see Pluto for the first time.

Lesson by Alan Stern, animation by Eoin Duffy.

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Visit Our Booth TODAY at the 2018 Livermore Wine Country Downtown Street Fest


We are hosting a GAME On! 

Visit our booth at the festival on Sunday, May 20th between 2:00pm and 5:00pm.

Individuals or groups can learn new games that include dice, cards, and board games.

In addition… the afternoon will include a hands-on introduction to building your own computer from PIPER Company.


For more information about Visit Livermore Downtown

Friday, May 18, 2018

Neuroscientist Explains the Laurel vs. Yanny Phenomenon | WIRED


The Laurel vs. Yanny debate is taking the internet by storm. WIRED's Louise Matsakis speaks with Tyler Perrachione, PhD, about why certain people hear Laurel when playing the now-infamous audio clip and others hear Yanny.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Summer Violin Workshop for Kids!


A course for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music. A recital will be held at the end of the course.

Ages: 7-15

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. To apply, please send your information to the email below. The instructor will contact you to schedule an audition. You may also submit an audition video of a piece and a major scale. Returning students do not need to audition. Deadline is on June 2nd, 2018.

Class size: 6-8 students

Duration of Course: 8 weeks

Schedule: Every Tuesdays from 6:00pm to 7:30pm (June 12th - July 31th ,2018)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $220.00

For more information, please contact Melissa Atienza at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Can You Solve the False Positive Riddle? - Alex Gendler


Mining unobtainium is hard work – the rare mineral appears in only 1% of rocks in the mine. But your friend Tricky Joe has something up his sleeve. The unobtainium detector he’s been perfecting for months is finally ready, and it returns accurate readings 90% of the time. But can it really be trusted? Alex Gendler explains the false positive paradox.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Come Visit Us at this Year’s Downtown Street Fest Livermore Wine Country 2018


We are hosting a GAME On! 

Visit our booth at the festival on Sunday, May 20th between 2:00pm and 5:00pm.

Individuals or groups can learn new games that include dice, cards, and board games.

In addition… the afternoon will include a hands-on introduction to building your own computer from PIPER Company.


For more information about Visit Livermore Downtown

Monday, May 7, 2018

What's the Difference Between Hibernation and Sleep? - Sheena Lee Faherty


The Arctic Ground Squirrel hibernates by burrowing under the permafrost and slipping into a state of suspended animation. The female black bear can give birth while she hibernates. The fat-tailed dwarf lemur prepares to hibernate by storing its fat reserves in its tail - doubling its body weight. Why do these animals go to such extremes? Sheena Lee Faherty details why animals hibernate.

Lesson by Sheena Lee Faherty, animation by Rémi Cans.

Saturday, May 5, 2018

Summer Violin Workshop for Kids!


A course for young violinists to group playing. Students will focus on playing with good intonation, rhythm and different bowing techniques. Kids will also develop their ensemble skills, i.e., playing their own parts in harmony with other parts, counting measures, music interpretation, listening skills and communicating with their peers through music. A recital will be held at the end of the course.

Ages: 7-15

Prerequisites: Minimum two years of violin lessons. Knowledge of at least two scales, basic rhythms and simple bowing techniques. To apply, please send your information to the email below. The instructor will contact you to schedule an audition. You may also submit an audition video of a piece and a major scale. Returning students do not need to audition. Deadline is on June 2nd, 2018.

Class size: 6-8 students

Duration of Course: 8 weeks

Schedule: Every Tuesdays from 6:00pm to 7:30pm (June 12th - July 31th ,2018)

Venue: Mozart, Einstein & Me, 620 First Street, Benicia, CA 94510

Instructor: Melissa Atienza

Tuition: $220.00

For more information, please contact Melissa Atienza at 415-632-7066 or atienzamelissa@yahoo.com

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Why Does Music Make Us Cry?


Join Jason Silva as he freestyles complex systems of society, technology and human existence and discusses the truth and beauty of science in a form of existential jazz.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Why Can't You Divide By Zero? - TED-Ed


In the world of math, many strange results are possible when we change the rules. But there’s one rule that most of us have been warned not to break: don’t divide by zero. How can the simple combination of an everyday number and a basic operation cause such problems?

Lesson by TED-Ed, animation by Nick Hilditch.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Playing Musical Instruments in the MRI - The Brain on Music



How does learning to play a musical instrument change the brain? Can music be instrumental (pun intended!) in helping people recovering from strokes?

These are just two questions being answered by researchers at McGill university and the Montreal Neurological Institute. Neurologist Robert Zatorre and his PhD Student Melanie Segado worked with Prof. Marcelo Wanderley, an engineer in the Schulich School of Music, and his student Avrum Hollinger in creating a cello that could be played in an MRI scanner to see how the brain changes as a result of playing a musical instrument.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

How I Found Myself Through Music | Anika Paulson


"Music is everywhere, and it is in everything," says musician, student and TED-Ed Clubs star Anika Paulson. Guitar in hand, she plays through the beats of her life in an exploration of how music connects us and makes us what we are.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Why Are Fish Fish-Shaped? - Lauren Sallan


In tropical seas, flying fish leap out of the water, gliding for up to 200 meters, before dipping back into the sea. In the Indo-Pacific, a hunting sailfish swims up to 110 kilometers per hour. These feats are made possible by a fish’s form -- which in most species is a smooth, long body, fins, and a tail. Lauren Sallan explains why these features are so common, and what it reveals about fish.

Lesson by Lauren Sallan, animation by Aeon Production.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

How Music Therapy Affects Moods


Menzie Pittman, a member of the National Association of Music Merchants, talks about the different ways music affects your mood

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

What Causes Headaches? - Dan Kwartler


In ancient Greece, the best-known remedy for a long-standing headache was to drill a small hole in the skull to drain supposedly infected blood. Fortunately, doctors today don’t resort to power tools to cure headaches, but we still have a lot to learn about this ancient ailment. Dan Kwartler shares what we know (and don't know) about headaches.

Lesson by Dan Kwartler, animation by Sharon Colman.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Cats vs. Gravity | Science of Stupid


Cats have an amazing ability to leap, but sometimes even the most sure-footed felines take a tumble.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Meet The Harmonica Man


After nine heart surgeries, "Harmonica Man" Andy Mackie stopped his prescriptions and used the money to spread the joy of music to kids. Watch Mackie in Steve Hartman's "Asssignment America."

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

The Science of Skin - Emma Bryce


Between you and the rest of the world lies an interface that makes up 16% of your physical weight. This is your skin, the largest organ in your body: laid out flat, it would cover close to 1.7 square metres of ground. But besides keeping your organs in, what is its purpose? Emma Bryce takes us into the integumentary system to find out.

Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Augenblick Studios.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

A Simple Way to Tell Insects Apart - Anika Hazra


There are nearly a million known insect species in the world, but most have one of just five common types of mouthparts. Why is this information useful to scientists? Anika Hazra explains how the features of an insect’s mouthparts can help identify which order it belongs to, while also providing clues about how it evolved and what it feeds on.

Lesson by Anika Hazra, animation by Giulia Martinelli.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Found Sounds: Making Instruments From Trash


Ken Butler is a Brooklyn-based artist and musician who has built over 400 musical instruments. But these aren't just any custom-built instruments. Butler builds his pieces from discarded items he finds on the streets of New York City. Hockey sticks, tennis rackets, brooms, golf clubs, pieces of furniture, styrofoam, toothbrushes: all are fair game for his masterpieces. It's musique concrète... jungle.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Oceans 101 | National Geographic


Oceans serve as the planet’s largest habitat and also help to regulate the global climate. But why is the ocean salty? And how is climate change impacting the ocean? Find out more about the ocean, including the consequences of and potential solutions to these changes.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Jazz Guitarist Stanley Jordan on Music Therapy Benefits


Jazz guitarist Stanley Jordan tells WSJ's Lee Hawkins about his study of music therapy and how it's used to help people overcome illnesses and chronic conditions. Photo: Stanley Jordan

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Can You Solve the Buried Treasure Riddle? - Daniel Griller


After a massive storm tears through the Hex Archipelago, you find five grizzled survivors in the water. As an act of gratitude for saving them, they reveal a secret – the island they were just on holds some buried treasure. But when the sailors try to describe the island, something seems off. Can you find the booty despite their strange instructions? Daniel Griller shows how.

Lesson by Daniel Griller, animation by Patrick Smith.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Exploring Music's Impact on the Brain


Duke University professors conduct an experiment on a professional violinist that explains the science behind the brain’s ability to process music.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

The Benefits of Taking Part in Music


The benefits of music are endless! One of the areas that it can make a difference to is physical and coordination.

Sunday, March 18, 2018

What in the World is Topological Quantum Matter? - Fan Zhang


David Thouless, Duncan Haldane, and Michael Kosterlitz won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016 for discovering that even microscopic matter at the smallest scale can exhibit macroscopic properties and phases that are topological. But … what does that mean? Fan Zhang helps decode some seriously tricky science.

Lesson by Fan Zhang, directed by Anton Trofimov.

Friday, March 16, 2018

The Scientific Benefits of Music


Did you know that listening to music is good for you? This is our science fact of the day and it is all about listening to your favorite tunes!

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Saturday, March 10, 2018

The Weird and Wonderful Metamorphosis of the Butterfly - Franziska Bauer


In order to become a butterfly, a caterpillar’s body dissolves almost completely and is rebuilt from its own juices. Butterflies are just a few of the 800,000 insect species that transition from larvae to adults through complete metamorphosis. But how exactly does this process work? Franziska Bauer explains how these squishy larvae emerge as armored, aerodynamic, and nimble adults.

Lesson by Franziska Bauer, animation by Avi Ofer.

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Top 10 Hardest Instruments to Learn


Playing an instrument isn’t easy to begin with, but these instruments will really test your patience!

Do you agree with this list? What would you change?

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Health Benefits for Seniors Learning to Play Musical Instruments


Researchers at the Western Sydney University's MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development say even a small amount of musical training can have long-lasting effects, particularly for seniors.

They say playing a musical instrument in retirement is one of the best ways to stay mentally and physically agile.

Music and psychology researcher with the institute, Dr Jennifer MacRitchie, has been studying the benefits of learning an instrument for the first time in people aged over 65, with her most recent study focusing on the piano.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Can You Solve the Seven Planets Riddle? - Edwin F. Meyer


Your interstellar police squad has tracked a group of criminals to a cluster of seven planets. Now you must apprehend them before their reinforcements arrive. Of course, the fugitives won’t just stay put – they’ll try to dodge you by moving from planet to planet. Can you devise a sequence for searching the planets that’s guaranteed to catch them in ten warps or less? Edwin F. Meyer shows how.

Lesson by Edwin F. Meyer, animation by TED-Ed.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Benefits of Music Therapy in Fighting Depression


At Newport Academy, teens learn to acknowledge and express their deep-rooted emotions through making and listening to music, and spend time playing music together.

Sunday, February 25, 2018

How Do Birds Learn to Sing? - Partha P. Mitra


A brown thrasher knows a thousand songs. A wood thrush can sing two pitches at once. A mockingbird can match the sounds around it — including car alarms. These are just a few of the 4,000 species of songbirds. How do these birds learn songs? How do they know to mimic the songs of their own species? Are they born knowing how to sing? Partha P. Mitra illuminates the beautiful world of birdsong.

Lesson by Partha P. Mitra, animation by TED-Ed.

Friday, February 23, 2018

Musical Highway | Crowd Control


Road contractors engineered an ingenious and melodic way to encourage drivers to obey the speed limit.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Sunday, February 18, 2018

The Coin Flip Conundrum - Po-Shen Loh


When you flip a coin to make a decision, there's an equal chance of getting heads and tails. What if you flipped two coins repeatedly, so that one option would win as soon as two heads showed up in a row on that coin, and one option would win as soon as heads was immediately followed by tails on the other? Would each option still have an equal chance? Po-Shen Loh describes the counterintuitive math behind this question.

Lesson by Po-Shen Loh, animation by Augenblick Studios.